Remembering Infinity

Spirituality | Metaphysics | Consciousness | Life


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Remembering Infinity: Traveling Light


Don’t let yesterday’s suffering, worries, or regrets keep you from soaring among the stars!

Rise above the past.  Don’t let yesterday’s suffering, worries, or regrets keep you from soaring among the stars!

I think it’s interesting how our childhood experiences have such an impact on how we perceive and react to things so much later in life, don’t you? The state of our environment in those early years has so much to do with our perspectives, our temperament, and our ways of dealing and coping with life.

In a recent post I wrote about how “different” I felt from other kids growing up. One of the differences seemed to be that I was always quite sensitive to the feelings of others—as well as my own. If one of my classmates was angry, sad, or afraid of something, I immediately related myself to their situation and almost felt their emotions myself. If I saw someone who was ill or injured, I seemed to feel at least some of their depression or pain. And if I saw someone suffering from abuse or the loss of a loved one, I somehow felt I was experiencing their suffering or grief—whether they were a stranger or not.

Whenever I felt emotions of my own, I’ve always tended to feel those quite deeply too. Growing up rather unhappily as an only child in a dysfunctional family (until a new sibling arrived some years later), I would often wallow in my own miserable silence for hours—or sometimes even days. With few constructive examples available to help teach me otherwise, I eventually learned to develop and rely on my own inner strengths to carry me through such challenging times.

I never fully realized that these feelings were so much of a problem or made such a difference until quite recently, when I began my journey of spiritual discovery in earnest. After reading a number of articles from other “sensitive” people who shared similar experiences, many things finally began to make sense to me. Like me, many of these people not only naturally “picked up on” others’ emotions and state of mind, they actually felt them in some manner. I even found out that there is a term used to describe those who have such experiences—they are said to be “empathic”.

To some, this may not be such an important revelation, but it made a great deal of difference to me. I realized that many of the feelings or stresses I had felt for years may not have even been entirely my own! I suddenly understood that, with some diligent effort at changing my own habits, I could eventually learn to separate my own emotional “baggage” from that of the people around me. This new understanding and a newfound ability to resolve and release my own stresses has allowed me to find much greater personal freedom, a growing sense of self-acceptance, and much needed inner peace.

So if you find yourself suddenly feeling a growing sense of tension, anger, fear, or any other strong emotion for no apparent reason, it could very well be that you are “empathic”. And if that’s the case, it means that you can learn to lighten your emotional load too. All it really takes is an understanding of the dynamics, a willingness to identify the possible sources of disharmony in your life, and an intention to let go of the emotions that don’t really belong to you. In this way it becomes much, much easier to focus on and resolve the issues that really are yours!

It’s amazing to see how much emotional baggage we can wind up carrying through the years. Sadly, many never truly understand quite how much—and they are burdened with it their entire lives. I’ve decided that, when my time comes to depart this world for the next, I’ll be traveling light.

After all, how can one’s soul ever hope to soar among the stars when it’s held down by the weight of yesterday’s suffering, worries, and regrets?

Love Always,

stargazericon

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Remembering Infinity: Working Through the Hurt


In those dark moments when you may feel abandoned and unloved, remember that you are loved!

In those dark moments when you may feel abandoned and unloved, remember that you are loved!

Of all the difficult emotions we experience in life, one of the ones I seem to deal with the most has been the feeling of rejection and hurt. As a child, I recall the sting I felt when I’d done something wrong and received a spanking as punishment—and the worst pain I felt wasn’t to my backside. It was more what I seemed to feel in my heart. Many times I didn’t fully understand what I’d done wrong and, at once, I felt hurt, saddened, and unloved. I’d cry, run to my room, then pout and stomp around for awhile—usually until I became distracted by something else and eventually forgot I was upset.

I’m sure we’ve all experienced similar feelings, in varying degrees, at one time or another. At older ages, we experience many of these same feelings too—perhaps when we’ve been turned down for a date, passed over for a promotion or job, or when we feel neglected or betrayed by our partner or spouse. In some of the more extreme cases, it may feel as if someone has “kicked us in the gut” or even “ripped out our heart”, but most often the circumstances simply leave a dull, hollow ache that seems to sit like a dense, heavy weight in the center of one’s chest.

Whenever we feel resentment or hurt, it’s quite easy to surrender to the accompanying anger and frustration. If we’re unable to deal with these overwhelming emotions in a positive way, we may lash out blindly or allow ourselves to spiral into despair. Sometimes, when we try to express ourselves and the way we feel, especially when we’re older, others expect us to hide our feelings or “just get over it”. Unfortunately, if we just ignore these emotions—especially if we keep experiencing many of the same hurts over and over, the stress we feel just seems to accumulate and become worse over time.

In recent years, I’ve found that, as I work through these challenging episodes, their impact seems less and the process of healing gradually becomes easier. While this process may not be the same for everyone, I’ve found the following steps to be generally quite helpful.

First, as soon as I begin to feel the “heat” of intense emotions rising, I make every effort to stay as calm and detached from them as possible. I try to imagine myself as a boat on the open sea, allowing the waves of adrenaline and distress to pass beneath me. Then I close my eyes and take several deep breaths as I envision the waves slowly dissipating. I consciously relax my body and mentally “let go” of any intensely charged emotions. These first brief moments often provide me with the space I need to remain calm and respond to the situation in a more balanced way. They also help to ensure that I don’t over-react and make things even worse.

Second, I try to take a moment to process things. If the situation is particularly stressful, I may separate myself entirely for a few minutes. I may go to a quiet room and sit down or take a brief walk to connect with nature. In either case, this brief period of separation allows me time to collect myself and gather my thoughts.

Next, I begin the healing process. If I’m feeling unloved and empty inside, it helps to close my eyes and try to feel love for myself. I envision the dark, empty space in my heart being filled with the golden Light of Universal Love, flowing and swirling in endlessly from Source. Sometimes I imagine my Higher Self as a being of pure, Divine Light, wrapping its arms around me in a warm, loving hug. If I’ve been rejected and have feelings of love that I’m somehow unable to otherwise express to someone else, I share that love with my Higher Self instead. This usually helps me to feel much better—for I know that I don’t need someone else’s love to heal me. I can always find the Love I need inside myself.

Once I’ve taken steps to settle down, I make every effort to face and address my emotions and the situation head-on. It helps to know that I don’t have to take on the challenge alone—for I may always seek guidance and support from family, friends, or other trusted sources.  I try to look at the situation as an important lesson in living and accept it—just as it is. I know I don’t have to dwell on it if I choose not to, and I decide how much attention and energy I’ll devote to reacting to or resolving it. Once I make that decision, I take whatever actions I feel are necessary to work things through. If I find that some things are beyond my control and I can’t fully resolve them, I simply do the best I can. Once I release any attachment to a specific outcome, I mentally “let go” of any remaining emotional stress (for more on that process, please see my post “Spirit Anchors”).  This allows me to move on confidently in the knowledge that I’ve done my very best.

Finally, I’ve found that, in many cases, it helps to just “sleep on it”. A good night’s rest often helps me put things in perspective and allows me to find fresh, new ways to approach challenges that I might have otherwise overlooked.  I also find that it’s much easier for me to find forgiveness—not only for others, but myself, in the dawn of a new day.

So if you’re ever feeling abandoned, empty, or unloved as I sometimes do, consider trying some of these ways to work things through.  And always remember that someone does love you unconditionally. God loves you—and I most certainly do too!

Respectfully,

stargazericon

Please feel free to redistribute, repost, or otherwise share this post, providing it is credited to https://rememberinginfinity.wordpress.com.