Remembering Infinity

Spirituality | Metaphysics | Consciousness | Life


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Remembering Infinity: Traveling Light


Don’t let yesterday’s suffering, worries, or regrets keep you from soaring among the stars!

Rise above the past.  Don’t let yesterday’s suffering, worries, or regrets keep you from soaring among the stars!

I think it’s interesting how our childhood experiences have such an impact on how we perceive and react to things so much later in life, don’t you? The state of our environment in those early years has so much to do with our perspectives, our temperament, and our ways of dealing and coping with life.

In a recent post I wrote about how “different” I felt from other kids growing up. One of the differences seemed to be that I was always quite sensitive to the feelings of others—as well as my own. If one of my classmates was angry, sad, or afraid of something, I immediately related myself to their situation and almost felt their emotions myself. If I saw someone who was ill or injured, I seemed to feel at least some of their depression or pain. And if I saw someone suffering from abuse or the loss of a loved one, I somehow felt I was experiencing their suffering or grief—whether they were a stranger or not.

Whenever I felt emotions of my own, I’ve always tended to feel those quite deeply too. Growing up rather unhappily as an only child in a dysfunctional family (until a new sibling arrived some years later), I would often wallow in my own miserable silence for hours—or sometimes even days. With few constructive examples available to help teach me otherwise, I eventually learned to develop and rely on my own inner strengths to carry me through such challenging times.

I never fully realized that these feelings were so much of a problem or made such a difference until quite recently, when I began my journey of spiritual discovery in earnest. After reading a number of articles from other “sensitive” people who shared similar experiences, many things finally began to make sense to me. Like me, many of these people not only naturally “picked up on” others’ emotions and state of mind, they actually felt them in some manner. I even found out that there is a term used to describe those who have such experiences—they are said to be “empathic”.

To some, this may not be such an important revelation, but it made a great deal of difference to me. I realized that many of the feelings or stresses I had felt for years may not have even been entirely my own! I suddenly understood that, with some diligent effort at changing my own habits, I could eventually learn to separate my own emotional “baggage” from that of the people around me. This new understanding and a newfound ability to resolve and release my own stresses has allowed me to find much greater personal freedom, a growing sense of self-acceptance, and much needed inner peace.

So if you find yourself suddenly feeling a growing sense of tension, anger, fear, or any other strong emotion for no apparent reason, it could very well be that you are “empathic”. And if that’s the case, it means that you can learn to lighten your emotional load too. All it really takes is an understanding of the dynamics, a willingness to identify the possible sources of disharmony in your life, and an intention to let go of the emotions that don’t really belong to you. In this way it becomes much, much easier to focus on and resolve the issues that really are yours!

It’s amazing to see how much emotional baggage we can wind up carrying through the years. Sadly, many never truly understand quite how much—and they are burdened with it their entire lives. I’ve decided that, when my time comes to depart this world for the next, I’ll be traveling light.

After all, how can one’s soul ever hope to soar among the stars when it’s held down by the weight of yesterday’s suffering, worries, and regrets?

Love Always,

stargazericon

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Remembering Infinity: Blank Pages


The fresh, blank page or canvas in front of you isn’t the insurmountable challenge you may think it is.

The fresh, blank page or canvas in front of you isn’t the insurmountable challenge you may think it is.

This post is dedicated to my friend, “Bookworm”.  May she find the inspiration she needs to become the next great sci-fi/fantasy author!

Blogging has been an interesting experience for me.  Through the discovery of many like-minded people here at WordPress and other blog providers, I’ve had the opportunity to explore, learn, and express myself through the simple exchange of thoughts and ideas over the Internet.  I’m consistently amazed by the inspiring creativity of others—and it’s wonderful to be able to engage people from all over the world in such a constructive and meaningful way.  While I’ve only been blogging for a short time, I’ve come to know a number of truly special people and I’m grateful to find that I consider so many to be my friends.

Now that I think of it, I can remember as a child, when my mom would write long letters to her “pen pals”.  These were long-distance acquaintances with whom she would exchange letters or photos in the mail.  Many of her pen pals lived thousands of miles away—in other parts of the United States and sometimes even in other parts of the world.  Back in those days, a letter could take at least a week or two to make its one-way trip, so correspondence was extremely slow by today’s standards.  Many now take instant electronic communication for granted, since that is all they’ve ever known, but I can truly appreciate the speed with which we may all stay in touch today.

While our modern communication methods are indeed terrific, I’ve found that blogging does have its challenges.  The one I seem to be facing lately, I like to call “Blank Page Syndrome”.  While this affliction may be better known as “Writer’s Block”, the challenge is still the same no matter what one may call it.  As much as I may want to write, I’ll sit down, pencil and pad in hand (yes, I still write my drafts the old-fashioned, low-tech way) and stare at those smug, blank pages.  I’ll typically begin to write with hesitation, sometimes a sentence or two, perhaps even a paragraph, then I’ll find that I’m completely dissatisfied with what I’ve written.  I’ll try again and again, often in fits and starts, only to wind up with two or three pages of eraser-scrubbed, lined-out gibberish.   Many times, I tear the pages off my pad, crumple them up, and toss them away in frustration and self-disgust.  How can it be that, at some times, the words flow forth with ease and fluency—and other times not so much, if at all?

So to my online blogging friends and the faithful few who follow “Remembering Infinity”, please know that I’m still here, reading and appreciating your creative posts, commenting and supporting where I can, and seeking inspiration wherever it may be found.  I’m not letting “Blank Page Syndrome” get me down, for I’m sure that many others experience it too—and I’m sure it’s only a temporary phase for all of us who are so afflicted.  I simply take it as a sign that my focus is meant to be elsewhere for the time being and work on some of the many other things that seem to require my attention.

If you’re a fellow blogger or an aspiring author and you find yourself staring at empty pages or a vacant computer screen as I’ve been doing lately, take heart.  Know that you’re in good company and you’re not alone.  There are lots of us out here in a similar situation and state of mind.  So don’t be discouraged…and above all, don’t give up! For this too shall pass. The fresh, blank page or canvas in front of you isn’t the insurmountable challenge you may think it is.  Just consider it to be the birthplace of the world’s next great masterpiece—and get started on it!  Before you know it, you may be surprised to find that the words have begun flowing through your pencil, pen, or your keyboard with the force and momentum of a mighty river.

Hey, would you look at that? I think I may have finally written something that’s worth sharing.  Will wonders never cease?  I suppose I’d better get this posted right away—before those pesky second thoughts get in my way!

With Love,

stargazericon

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Remembering Infinity: How Does Your Garden Grow?


In many ways, life is like a garden.

In many ways, life is like a garden.

Several weeks ago, I asked myself the same question that every gardener seems to ask him or herself each time the seasons change from one to another.  And as I looked out the back window at our patio, I was forced to admit that things didn’t look so great.  Our multi-year drought, mischievous dogs, and several windstorms over winter had left our yard in very rough shape.  Our shrubs were in disarray, most of last year’s plantings were dead, and dirt from our two large dogs’ various excavations was scattered all over the patio and its connecting walkway.

Inspired to action by the arrival of Spring and the sudden sprouting of new leaves and blossoms, I developed hasty plans to fence off several areas and plant new gardens in the protected spaces.  The design was such that it provided ample areas for me to plant, yet spaces remained for the dogs to run, chase squirrels, and even dig if they felt inclined to do so (and I’ve no doubt they will).

I spent several weekends sinking redwood posts in concrete, stapling rolls of wire fencing material to them, and hauling home sacks of manure, compost, mulch, and stone.  I arranged rocks, tilled soil, and removed last year’s spent plantings and debris—all in preparation for this year’s fresh new growth.  Finally, after much effort, I was ready to plant!  I took several trips to nearby nurseries, where I picked out a wonderful variety of flowering plants, bulbs, and seeds.  I spent the better part of three afternoons working barefoot and bare-handed in the warm sunshine, planting and arranging, arranging and planting.  As each phase of my plan unfolded, I’d sit back to study the bare patches of earth for a moment, dig an appropriately-sized hole in just the right spot, and gently tuck each infant plant or seedling in its new home.  Once everything had been carefully set in place, I watered the entire garden with a gentle shower from the hose.

With my work done for the day and for the most difficult part of the project complete, I sat down with a cold drink to enjoy the sights, sounds, and smells around me.  Birds flitted busily about, wind chimes tinkled gently in the tree above, and I breathed in the heady aromas of damp earth and flowers blooming.  The new plantings seemed small and tentative in their new spaces, but I could quite easily see their potential for a brilliant future—and I imagined and intended for it to be exactly that.

In many ways, I mused, our lives are just like gardens.  We imagine them.  We work hard to prepare a place for them, carefully plant seeds of thought and deed, and shower them with our Love and attention.  In the end, the condition of our garden is a living reflection of all the care and energy we devote to it.  To be sure, there’s always some pruning to do, a weed to be pulled here and there, or a dog to be shooed away, but with proper care, our reward can be a glowing, vibrant oasis of beauty, joy, and peace.

Silly me.  As I was lost in thought about gardens and life, I was interrupted by a slight commotion behind me.  I turned to see that one of my dogs had squeezed through a small gap in the fence and was sniffing about, exploring one of my new garden beds.  Leave it to her to figure out a way around my defenses!  Fortunately, I intercepted her and fixed the trouble spot before any significant damage was done.  I suppose it just goes to show that even the best laid plans aren’t always foolproof—or, in my case, dog-proof.

Since Spring is here, now is the perfect time for each of us to create new growth and constructive change in our lives and, indeed, in our world.  All it takes is a bit of inspiration, some dedicated effort, and some tender, loving, care.

Now that Spring is here, it’s a great time to ask ourselves that age-old gardener’s question—”How does your garden grow?”

Respectfully,

stargazericon

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Remembering Infinity: The Fun House


Sometimes, life can make us feel as if we’re trapped inside a giant, ever-changing kaleidoscope.

Sometimes, life can make us feel as if we’re trapped inside a giant, ever-changing kaleidoscope.

When I was a kid, I loved going to “Playland”. Playland was the quintessential beachside amusement park, complete with all kinds of carnival-style rides, a thrilling, twisty roller coaster, head-snapping bumper cars, and all sorts of skill games and prizes. On some special occasions (such as a birthday) my family and I would spend the better part of a day there. Dazzled by the lights, screams, and laughter of fellow revelers, we’d stroll along the Midway, eating hot dogs, popcorn, and cotton candy as we went.

Of all the attractions, the Fun House was my favorite. Everything was padded, even the floor, and you had to take off your shoes before you could go in.  In addition to many other things, it housed a huge, polished wooden slide, a giant spinning “record player”, and a dark, tunnel-like rolling barrel. The slide was several stories high and, if you were brave enough to sit on a burlap sack and let go at the top, the slippery ride down—with its several air-catching humps, would make your stomach feel a bit queasy. The giant “record player” was a blast, for people would sit on its flat wooden surface and squeeze together in the hope of staying on as it spun. The circular platform turned slowly at first, then it gradually gained speed, spinning faster and faster. One by one, we’d all fly off and careen into the padded walls. Only those in the center of the “record” stood any chance of staying on for the full ride—and that was only if they could somehow manage to endure the disorienting spinning motion. Finally, everyone would try to walk through the rolling barrel without falling down in a helpless, laughing heap. The latter two challenges always left us dizzy, giggling, and barely able to walk—or even stand up straight.

Everything in the Fun House, it seems, was designed to confuse, distract, disorient, and entertain—and it all worked marvelously! Bold stripes, vibrant colors, and sudden, hissing puffs of air from hidden nozzles assailed us from all angles as we raced from one attraction to the next.

Inside the Fun House, the Hall of Mirrors was one of the most challenging obstacles of the entire park. With its floor-to-ceiling polished mirrors and unpredictable twists and turns, only the bravest of souls dared enter. In many ways I suppose, a trip through the Hall was like being trapped inside a giant, ever-changing kaleidoscope. Some of the mirrors were perfectly smooth and clear, while others presented us with distorted reflections of ourselves. In one mirror, for example, one might be tall and thin. In another, one might be short and fat. In yet another, one might be wavy or even top-heavy.

Once inside the Hall of Mirrors, it sometimes felt it as if I’d never find my way out. The brilliantly-designed, holographic labyrinth frustrated every attempt at escape. I’d walk forward, only to crash into a reflection of myself or someone else. I’d turn a corner, thinking it was the way out, only to find it was a dead end. In this distorted world of confusion and false images, I felt nearly overwhelmed by feelings of fear, anger, and frustration. Once my older cousins began to help me along however, I gradually learned to overcome my sense of panic. I gained the confidence that allowed me to more carefully and patiently find my way out. Once through, I was gratefully reunited with those of my family who had waited outside. It took several successful trips through the mirrored maze before I finally felt comfortable enough to even begin enjoying the challenge.

Many years later, it occurs to me that life in the “physical realm” is a lot like a journey through the Hall of Mirrors. Things are rarely what they seem, the Truth of our path is cleverly hidden, and it’s exceedingly difficult not to become immersed in and confused by all the panic and commotion that surrounds us. At those times when I feel most lost in the maze of Life’s mirrors, I’ve learned that it helps to just stop for a moment and seek my own inner calm. The quiet sense of peace and reassurance I find reminds me that this is all just a game—and that everything here is just an illusion. I even seem to recall that I chose to be here—just so I could have this very experience. This soon helps me realize that I needn’t be afraid and, once I re-discover this, my journey quickly becomes fun again! I’m then able to move forward in confidence, knowing that one day I’ll eventually find my way out—and back to the Home I’ve always known.

So if the illusion of Life ever overtakes you and you find yourself feeling even a little afraid, just remember that it’s perfectly OK. Everyone feels that way from time to time.  Just grab my hand or the hand of the person next to you. We can all make our way through this amazing and wonderful House of Mirrors…together.

Respectfully,

stargazericon

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Remembering Infinity: Working Through the Hurt


In those dark moments when you may feel abandoned and unloved, remember that you are loved!

In those dark moments when you may feel abandoned and unloved, remember that you are loved!

Of all the difficult emotions we experience in life, one of the ones I seem to deal with the most has been the feeling of rejection and hurt. As a child, I recall the sting I felt when I’d done something wrong and received a spanking as punishment—and the worst pain I felt wasn’t to my backside. It was more what I seemed to feel in my heart. Many times I didn’t fully understand what I’d done wrong and, at once, I felt hurt, saddened, and unloved. I’d cry, run to my room, then pout and stomp around for awhile—usually until I became distracted by something else and eventually forgot I was upset.

I’m sure we’ve all experienced similar feelings, in varying degrees, at one time or another. At older ages, we experience many of these same feelings too—perhaps when we’ve been turned down for a date, passed over for a promotion or job, or when we feel neglected or betrayed by our partner or spouse. In some of the more extreme cases, it may feel as if someone has “kicked us in the gut” or even “ripped out our heart”, but most often the circumstances simply leave a dull, hollow ache that seems to sit like a dense, heavy weight in the center of one’s chest.

Whenever we feel resentment or hurt, it’s quite easy to surrender to the accompanying anger and frustration. If we’re unable to deal with these overwhelming emotions in a positive way, we may lash out blindly or allow ourselves to spiral into despair. Sometimes, when we try to express ourselves and the way we feel, especially when we’re older, others expect us to hide our feelings or “just get over it”. Unfortunately, if we just ignore these emotions—especially if we keep experiencing many of the same hurts over and over, the stress we feel just seems to accumulate and become worse over time.

In recent years, I’ve found that, as I work through these challenging episodes, their impact seems less and the process of healing gradually becomes easier. While this process may not be the same for everyone, I’ve found the following steps to be generally quite helpful.

First, as soon as I begin to feel the “heat” of intense emotions rising, I make every effort to stay as calm and detached from them as possible. I try to imagine myself as a boat on the open sea, allowing the waves of adrenaline and distress to pass beneath me. Then I close my eyes and take several deep breaths as I envision the waves slowly dissipating. I consciously relax my body and mentally “let go” of any intensely charged emotions. These first brief moments often provide me with the space I need to remain calm and respond to the situation in a more balanced way. They also help to ensure that I don’t over-react and make things even worse.

Second, I try to take a moment to process things. If the situation is particularly stressful, I may separate myself entirely for a few minutes. I may go to a quiet room and sit down or take a brief walk to connect with nature. In either case, this brief period of separation allows me time to collect myself and gather my thoughts.

Next, I begin the healing process. If I’m feeling unloved and empty inside, it helps to close my eyes and try to feel love for myself. I envision the dark, empty space in my heart being filled with the golden Light of Universal Love, flowing and swirling in endlessly from Source. Sometimes I imagine my Higher Self as a being of pure, Divine Light, wrapping its arms around me in a warm, loving hug. If I’ve been rejected and have feelings of love that I’m somehow unable to otherwise express to someone else, I share that love with my Higher Self instead. This usually helps me to feel much better—for I know that I don’t need someone else’s love to heal me. I can always find the Love I need inside myself.

Once I’ve taken steps to settle down, I make every effort to face and address my emotions and the situation head-on. It helps to know that I don’t have to take on the challenge alone—for I may always seek guidance and support from family, friends, or other trusted sources.  I try to look at the situation as an important lesson in living and accept it—just as it is. I know I don’t have to dwell on it if I choose not to, and I decide how much attention and energy I’ll devote to reacting to or resolving it. Once I make that decision, I take whatever actions I feel are necessary to work things through. If I find that some things are beyond my control and I can’t fully resolve them, I simply do the best I can. Once I release any attachment to a specific outcome, I mentally “let go” of any remaining emotional stress (for more on that process, please see my post “Spirit Anchors”).  This allows me to move on confidently in the knowledge that I’ve done my very best.

Finally, I’ve found that, in many cases, it helps to just “sleep on it”. A good night’s rest often helps me put things in perspective and allows me to find fresh, new ways to approach challenges that I might have otherwise overlooked.  I also find that it’s much easier for me to find forgiveness—not only for others, but myself, in the dawn of a new day.

So if you’re ever feeling abandoned, empty, or unloved as I sometimes do, consider trying some of these ways to work things through.  And always remember that someone does love you unconditionally. God loves you—and I most certainly do too!

Respectfully,

stargazericon

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Remembering Infinity: The Treasure Hunt


The value of the riches that may be found on our spiritual “treasure hunt” will far exceed that of any and all worldly treasures.

The value of the riches that may be found on our spiritual “treasure hunt” will far exceed that of any and all worldly treasures.

Several weeks back, I received some inspiration through a comment from a reader (thanks, Matthew!) that led me to think of life and our spiritual evolution as a treasure hunt—and isn’t that just the perfect analogy for it?

A treasure hunt usually begins with an “awakening”, when someone stumbles across a mysterious clue of some kind. Perhaps they accidentally discover a faded map hidden in a picture frame, tucked away in an old trunk in a dusty attic, or buried in the yard of a neglected old home. The mysterious clue fills the finder with excitement and dreams of uncovering great wealth. They then embark on an amazing journey, fraught with myriad challenges and danger. Through it all, they are sustained by an undying faith that their search will prove worthwhile in the end.

Treasure hunts bring to mind visions of musty chests filled with silver coins, gold bullion, and precious gemstones. Sometimes the finds are ancient artifacts that reveal mystic secrets and long-hidden knowledge. I recall my own dreams of treasure as a young child, when my mom or dad would hide a few coins or a candy bar in our home and leave me a few hidden, cryptic clues that would lead me to the cache. I was also entertained by many books and movies, typically of the pirate or “Wild West” genre, that captivated me with their thrills, unexpected danger, and tales of woe and heartbreak.

It seems to me that our life journeys are much the same. We’re given a few clues that hint of the priceless riches that await us, we keep moving forward on our path toward the discovery of our own Spiritual Truth, and we overcome the many challenges that confront us along the way. In modern times, we may not always have to fend off hordes of marauders, bands of hostile guerrillas, or fierce competitors, but the stumbling blocks are there nonetheless—and they are just as formidable in their own right. Our quest is indeed difficult for, in many ways, we’re nudged along and bolstered only by our hopes, dreams, and a deep, personal faith that such a treasure truly exists.

Where our own incredible journeys are concerned, I wish to share my confidence that, not only do such treasures exist, their riches far exceed any visions one might have of any and all material wealth. Nothing can compare to the priceless knowledge and discoveries we collect along the twists and turns of our paths. Our clues may be shrouded in mystery and quite difficult to find, but to the true seekers they are there—and they will eventually be found. And if we work together, freely sharing our experiences and encouraging one another along the way, one day we’ll all lift that heavy, creaking lid and gaze in wonder upon our own hidden treasures.

I think too that one day we may be surprised to find that the riches we’ve sought for so long won’t be found the chest at the end of the trail after all. We may just discover that the ultimate treasure was the excitement and the experience of the hunt itself!

Respectfully,

stargazericon

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Remembering Infinity: If You Don’t Mind…


Age (and every other limitation you can think of) is a case of mind over matter.  If you don’t mind, it just doesn’t matter!

Age (and every other limitation you can think of) is a case of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it just doesn’t matter!

There’s a familiar philosophical saying that states, “Where attention goes, energy flows”. A similar quote by noted psychiatrist and psychotherapist Carl Jung states, “What you resist, persists.” To me, these perceptive sayings are two similar ways of saying the same thing—they simply mean that the more we focus on something, the stronger it grows and the longer it will remain in our consciousness. Whether they’re aches and pains, negative thoughts, or allergies and illness, the more thought and attention we give them, the greater will be their affect upon us.

I’m sure you’ve all had those days—the ones where you get up in the morning and you just feel “off” somehow? You may have even gone to bed early and slept well, but when it came to getting up you just weren’t feeling the enthusiasm you needed to actually get up and carry on with the day. Sometimes, you might succumb to the feeling, shut off the alarm, call in sick to work, and pull the covers back over your head. Other days you might just shake it off, get up, and get on with it—often finding that your weariness was just a temporary feeling.

So what made the difference between these two reactions to a less-than-stellar start to the day? You did! In the latter reaction, you looked past a limiting, negative feeling and chose to focus on the possibility that you could experience something better instead. By making the conscious choice to get up and embrace the day despite your initial feelings, you set your intent to look past these limitations and experience the day in a new and positive way.

There are lots of other times when this strategy is helpful as well. When things suddenly go wrong during the day, when we feel illness or pain, or when we’re feeling afraid, frustrated, and angry, we’re often tempted to surrender to the influence of these negative “triggers”. At such times it’s important to realize that we do have a choice. We can allow them to overcome us—or not. If we acknowledge them, accept them, appreciate them, and let them go, we may then consciously choose to look past them and focus instead on the things, already inside us, that we would rather acknowledge and bring forward—things like health, strength, calm, and comfort. When we make the right choice, often before we even realize it, the unpleasant thoughts or feelings will have passed and we’ll be right back on track.

I think of this principle often, but I can almost guarantee I’ll be reminded of it every year on my—or someone else’s birthday. Those are the occasions when some have a tendency to bemoan life and complain about getting another year older. Me? Nah. I don’t think so! I choose to embrace the day. I’m grateful to have experienced another 365 days of life on this wonderful earth of ours—and I’m looking forward to experiencing as many more as I possibly can before I move on to the next mysterious adventure that awaits.

As I frequently tell my family and anyone else who will listen, age (and every other limitation you can think of) is just a case of mind over matter. If you don’t mind, it just doesn’t matter!

Respectfully,

stargazericon

Please feel free to redistribute, repost, or otherwise share this post, providing it is credited to https://rememberinginfinity.wordpress.com.